Tehran in the 1950s

Below are a number of photographs of Tehran’s districts, avenues, radio stations, traditional venues, recreation areas and airport as they appeared in the 1950s. Readers may find these previous postings of interest as well:

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North Tehran

Darband and Elahiye district in 1957.

Parks & Recreation

Amjadiyeh pool and sports complex in 1958.

Bagh e Shah

Saadi-Theatre-1The Saadi Theatre – note patrons checking showtimes at panel. The smaller sign situated just at the right of theatre sign is “Bank e Melli Iran” (National Bank of Iran) (Photo from Getty Images – Published in Avaxnews.com).

Snapshots of some of Tehran’s Major Avenues in the 1950s

Saadi Avenue in 1951.

Naderi Avenue in the winter of 1951.

Tehran-Naderi Avenue -1953Naderi avenue in the fall of 1953.

Pahlavi Avenue in 1955.

Sepah Salar Avenue 1957.

Tehran Banks

The Bank Melli (National Bank) of Tehran. Note how the architecture blends elements of ancient pre-Islamic Iranian motifs  (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images).

Tehran Schools

A Tehran schoolgirl in the early 1950s at a vocational training school for seamstresses (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images). She is studying a physics book.

Snapshots of some of Tehran’s Traditional Venues and Shopping Districts

Tehran Bazaar in 1954.

Enjoying an outdoor shave in Tehran in 1958. 

Shahr e Farang in Tehran in 1958.

Tehran’s International Mehrabad Airport

Mehrabad Airport in 1958.

Mehrabad Airport check in terminals in 1958.

Tehran Radio

Radio Tehran in 1951.

Photos of Old Tehran: 1920s-1940s (Part II)

The posting below is a continuation of a previous posting entitled “Photos of Old Tehran: 1920s-1940s (Part I)” …

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Dapper Tehran motorist 1940sA dapper Tehran motorist circa mid-late 1930s or early 1940s.

Nasser Khosrow

Nasser Khosrow in the 1920s

Further down on Nasser Khosrow street in the 1920s.

Nasser khosrow avenue, Tehran, 1946.

Istanbul Avenue

Istanbul avenue, Tehran, 1949.

Post and Telegraph Office

 Post and Telegraph Office, Tehran, 1946.

 Post and Telegraph Office, Tehran, circa 1930s.

Mokhber-o-Dowleh

Mokhber-o-Dowleh, Tehran, 1946.

Sepah Square

Sepah Square early 1920s.

Sepah Square circa late 1930s.

Tehran Banks

Firdowsi street and Melli (National) Bank circa 1940s.

The Melli (National) Bank, Tehran, 1946.

 

Bank-e Bazargani (Bank of Commerce) in 1941.

Christopher I. Beckwith: Empires of the Silk Road

Readers are introduced to Professor Christopher I. Beckwith’s text: “Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Asia from the Bronze Age to the Present” (available on Amazon.com):

SR-Beckwith-1

  • Author: Christopher I. Beckwith
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Date: Reprinted in 2011
  • ISBN-10: 0691150346; ISBN-13: 978-0691150345

This book is recommended reading for Kaveh Farrokh’s Fall 2014 course “The Silk Route Origins and History“. Readers interested in the history of the Silk Route are also referred to the “Soghdian-Turkish Relations Symposium” (21-23 November, 2014) being held in Istanbul, Turkey (for brochure of conference, list of participants, etc., kindly click on images below to enlarge): Sogut_Program

Sogut_Program2

Christopher I. Beckwith’s text provides a comprehensive history of Central Eurasia from antiquity to the current era. This is an excellent text that provides a critical analysis of the Empires of the Silk Road by analyzing the true origins and history of this critical region of Eurasia.

ForeignerWithWineskin-Earthenware-TangDynasty-ROM-May8-08

Statue of a foreigner holding a wineskin, Tang Dynasty (618-907) (Photo source: Public Domain).

Beckwith examines the history of the great and forgotten Central Eurasian empires, notably those of the Iranic peoples such as the Scythians, the Hsiang-Nou peoples (e.g. Attila the Hun, Turks, Mongols, etc.) and their interaction with China, Tibet and Persia.

Pamir_Mountains,_Tajikistan,_06-04-2008

One of the critical land bridges of the Silk Route: the Pamir Mountains which as a 2-way gigantic connector between the civilizations of the east and West (Photo source: Public Domain).

Beckwith outlines the scientific, artistic and economic impacts of Central Asia upon world civilization. Beckwith also tabulates the history of the Indo-European migrations out of Central Eurasia, and their admixture with several settled peoples, resulting in the great (Indo-European) civilizations of India, Persia, Greece and Rome. The impact of these peoples upon China is also examined.

 Mid15thCenturyPotteryNorthernItaly

Italian pottery of the 1450s influenced by Chinese ceramic arts; housed at the Louvre Museum, Paris (Photo source: Public Domain).

This is a book that has been long overdue: Empires of the Silk Road places Central Eurasia within the major framework of world history and civilization. It is perhaps this quote by Beckwith which demonstrates his acumen on the subject:

The dynamic, restless Proto-Indo-Europeans whose culture was born there [Eurasia] migrated across and discovered the Old World, mixing with the local peoples and founding the Classical civilizations of the Greeks and Romans, Iranians, Indians, and ChineseCentral Eurasians – not the Egyptians, Sumerians, and so on– are our ancestors. Central Eurasia is our homeland, the place where our civilization started” (2009, p.319).

BegramGladiator

Second century CE Kushan ceramic vase from Begram with a “Western” motif: a Greco-Roman gladiator (Photo source: Public Domain). The Silk Route challenges the fallacy of a so-called “Clash of Civilizations” – to the contrary, East and West have had extensive adaptive contacts since the dawn of history.

Photos of Old Tehran: 1920s-1940s (Part I)

This posting is a continuation of a previous posting entitled “Maps and Photos of Old Tehran” (click Image below for details):

02b-Tehran-Map-1848

Below are photos of Old Tehran in the time span of the 1920s to the 1940s.

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Commercial Areas

tehran-drugstoreTehran drugstore, circa early 1920s.

Sepahsalar Mosque

sepahsalar-mosque-ealry-1920sSepahsalar Mosque, circa early 1920s.

Sports Stadiums

amjadiyeh-sports-stadium-circa-1936Soccer match at Amjadiyeh Sports Stadium, circa 1935-1936.

Laleh-Zar Street

cafe-pars-lalelhzar-1920sCafe Pars Laleh-Zar, 1920s.

laleh-zar-1circa-1940sLaleh-Zar street circa 1930s.

laleh-zar-street-circa-1940sLaleh-Zar street circa 1940s.

laleh-zar-19471Another view of Laleh-Zar street circa 1940s.

lalehzar Avenue 1946Laleh-Zar street in 1946.

Other Tehran Locales

south-end-of-naderi-intersection-at-south-end-of-british-embassySouth end of Naderi intersection and south end of the British embassy, circa late 1930s.

Shahabad 1949Shahabad in 1949.

old-tajrishTajrish as it appeared in Tehran circa 1940s.

Cafe naderi 1947The Cafe Naderi in 1946, famous for its deserts, coffee, teas, etc. and its jovial atmosphere.

Maps and Photos of Old Tehran 1826-1900

Below are maps and photos of Old Tehran, kavehfarrokh.com is indebted to contributions by numerous history enthusiasts, including Fathali Ghahremani who contributed the old maps seen on this page.

01-Tehran-Map-1826

[Click to Enlarge] Map of Tehran dated to 1826.

Theran-NasseredinShah-era

This photo is from (circa) 1871, during the Nasser e Din Shah era – it is the oldest known photo of Tehran. The name of the street today is Mirdamad. -نام کنونی این محل بلوار میرداماد میباشد-طهران در دوران حکومت ناصرالدين شاه قاجار-سال ۱۲۵۰ خورشیدی-

02b-Tehran-Map-1848

[Click to Enlarge] Map of Tehran dated to 1848.

Old-Tehran-gate-Qajar-era

One of Tehran’s gates during the Qajar era -یکی از دروازه های قدیمی تهران زمان قاجار-

Oldest Map of Tehran

[Click to Enlarge] Map of Tehran dated to 1858 [NOTE: this is very high resolution image which may take a little time to load].

Tea-Coffee-House-Tehran-Qajar-era

[Click to Enlarge] A Tea and Coffee house in Tehran in the late Qajar era-قهوه خانه در بازار تهران –

9-Tehran-Meydan-Mashq-Qajar-era

میدان مشق در تهران زمان قاجار– Tehran’s Meydan Mashq during the Qajar era; note the paintings on the structure.

Tehran-bazaar-Qajar-era1

[Click to Enlarge] Tehran Bazaar in the late Qajar era -بازار تهران-

Tehran_1890_(1)

[Click to Enlarge] Interesting map of Tehran in 1890 – note legend markers.

Bread-bakery-Qajar-era1

[Click to Enlarge]Bread bakery (Sangak bread) in late qajar era –نانوائی اواخر دوره قاجار

05b-Tehran-Map-1900

[Click to Enlarge]Map of Tehran dated to 1900.